Poggenpohl Boston

Looking for someone to assist you with your kitchen design? This designer specializes in working with Sub-Zero and Wolf products.

Poggenpohl Boston
(215) 940-3110
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Design Professionals

  • Rosemary Porto

Let there be light

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Rosemary Porto

Regional Award Winner KDC 2013-14

Rosemary Porto has been an interior designer in Boston since 1985 and specializes in innovative, high-end kitchen and bath interior design that integrates luxury with a function-first mindset. As Senior Designer of Poggenpohl, Boston she is well known for her ability to incorporate the latest innovations into her designs. The essence of her work is seen in translating her clients’ vision into a design that aligns with the harmony of their homes. Rosemary has strong strategic alliances with leading architects, builders and interior designers on new construction and renovations. Her award winning designs have been frequently featured in national and regional shelter magazines. Ms. Porto has been a frequent speaker at industry events and panel presentations.

In the ASID New England chapter Rosemary is serving as Director-at-Large for the 2014-16 Board of Directors, as well as heading up of the Industry Partners committee serving the local chapter membership. She has been a member of IFDA since 1996, serving as President of the New England chapter in 2002; she is an active member of the Boston Society of Architects on the Women in Design committee. Rosemary uses her position in the showroom to host many charity events as well as industry events for the design community. She was inducted into the New England Design Hall of Fame 2014 on November 5th, 2014. Her design won the regional prize in the 2013-2014 Sub Zero and Wolf Kitchen Design Contest.

Q&A with Rosemary Porto

Where do you find design inspiration?

My clients inspire me. Their accomplishments. Their unique viewpoints of the world. I soak it all in and try to create something spectacular that speaks to their needs, their lives. Modern European architecture and furniture inspire my kitchen designs. As an interior designer I look at kitchens as just another room that needs furniture. Of course the need for appliances adds sport to the game.

How do you approach the design process?

I ask my clients about their lives, how they cook, how they live. There’s always a little something that is special that comes through. Maybe a trip they took, or a particular piece they treasure. I start to weave the idea of their kitchen around that special moment so the room is a reflection of their lives.

What is the greatest value you provide your client?

I am a very good listener and therefore I have been successful at fulfilling my clients’ vision for their new kitchen. After the kitchen is completed and they tell me “You heard me”, I am truly rewarded.

What does the Sub-Zero and Wolf Kitchen Design Contest mean to you?

Winning the Sub Zero Wolf Kitchen Design Contest is a dream come true for me. I have submitted designs before and I always hoped that one day my design would be recognized. And in 2015 my wish became a reality. I am thrilled!

What are some of the current design trends?

Contemporary designs are really taking off across the country. The NKBA just published a report sub titled “Cleaner, more contemporary designs to dominate in 2015”. Of course this is exactly what I have been doing for the last 13 years since I joined Poggenpohl. We have a special way of mixing finishes that warm up the modern look. We also understand what it really means to design in this style. Going minimal is not easily done.

Where do you see kitchen design going in the next 5 years?

To accommodate the housing trend of building smaller more efficient housing, as an industry we must create the most functional kitchen designs in smaller floor plans. Throughout Europe this has been a way of life. That is the reason companies like Poggenpohl have the edge on the American market when it comes to understanding how to make the most functional kitchen smaller. Baby Boomers are moving from their suburban homes into city condos and apartments. There will be a growing need for smaller footprint, super-efficient kitchens over the next 5 years.