Ibarra Rosano Design Architects

Looking for someone to assist you with your kitchen design? This designer specializes in working with Sub-Zero and Wolf products.

Ibarra Rosano Design Architects
2849 East Sylvia Street Tucson, AZ 85716
(520) 795-5477
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Portfolio

Designers

  • Luis Ibarra

  • Teresa Rosano

  • Q & A

Levin Kitchen

View Kitchen

Luis Ibarra

Kitchen Design Contest Winner
Regional Award Winner
KDC 2010-12

Teresa Rosano (AIA, LEED AP) and Luis Ibarra, each have Bachelor of Architecture degrees from the University of Arizona in Tucson where their practice is based and where they currently teach and coordinate design at the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture. The couple founded Ibarra Rosano Design Architects in 1999 after winning their first international design award. Since then, the duo has continued to earn international recognition for their unique desert modern architecture.

Two years later Architecture Magazine recognized Ibarra Rosano in its issue on the "Arizona School" featuring their state’s design vanguards. Since then, their work has gone on to be published in over 150 national and international publications and has received over fifty design awards. Their work has twice been exhibited in the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art where they were also commissioned for an exhibit installation.

They were nominated for a Cooper Hewitt Design Award in 2006. In 2008 Residential Architect Magazine awarded Ibarra Rosano with their "Rising Star - National Leadership Award” and were included among 50 international firms in their "RA50: Short List of Architects We Love". Ibarra and Rosano have been invited to present their work in places as far as Quito, Ecuador but their work aims at remaining true to the regions where they work.

Levin Kitchen

View Kitchen

Teresa Rosano

Kitchen Design Contest Winner
Regional Award Winner
KDC 2010-12

Teresa Rosano (AIA, LEED AP) and Luis Ibarra, each have Bachelor of Architecture degrees from the University of Arizona in Tucson where their practice is based and where they currently teach and coordinate design at the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture. The couple founded Ibarra Rosano Design Architects in 1999 after winning their first international design award. Since then, the duo has continued to earn international recognition for their unique desert modern architecture.

Two years later Architecture Magazine recognized Ibarra Rosano in its issue on the "Arizona School" featuring their state’s design vanguards. Since then, their work has gone on to be published in over 150 national and international publications and has received over fifty design awards. Their work has twice been exhibited in the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art where they were also commissioned for an exhibit installation.

They were nominated for a Cooper Hewitt Design Award in 2006. In 2008 Residential Architect Magazine awarded Ibarra Rosano with their "Rising Star - National Leadership Award” and were included among 50 international firms in their "RA50: Short List of Architects We Love". Ibarra and Rosano have been invited to present their work in places as far as Quito, Ecuador but their work aims at remaining true to the regions where they work.

Where do you find design inspiration?

Everywhere; plants, people, places … all things that are simple and straightforward, things that work on a variety of levels and are adaptive and appropriate to use and place and time. When we spot something like that we take note - places and things that are born out of solving problems very directly, applying logic and practicality so completely that they often transcend pragmatism and become art.

How do you approach the design process?

We try to approach it as straightforwardly and as sensibly as those things that inspire us. We simply try to stay out of the way personally. What we mean by that is to recognize that our role is to discover the true questions and solve the problems objectively. For us it’s not about self-expression but about expressing the problem.

What makes your aesthetic stand out amongst other designers?

We don’t know that it stands out, that is certainly not our objective. Our aesthetic is not about styles or “isms”. Describing things by way of styles and “isms” is common practice because it aids teams in visualizing the end product, but that communicative expediency is antithetical to creative problem solving because it relies on prepackaged, predetermined outcomes. It not only limits the ultimate vision, it assumes the question to be pre-understood as well. Recognizing that every problem is a unique opportunity may be what is different in our approach. Our belief is that when every decision, every manifestation is based on something real and true, when every resolution is an answer to a problem, we can achieve timelessness and beauty. It’s our technique for avoiding trendy work. Expressing the problem, this is nature’s way.

What is the greatest value you provide to your clients?

Our clients get someone who is looking out for their best interest. We are friends with practically all of our clients and they are very happy living in the work we have done together. We become a team. We listen and then guide. I don’t know that this is so unique however, we’re sure others do this as well. I guess the greatest value might be the friendship, teamwork and the memory of working together.